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(MKR-0146) Human Genetic Correlates of the Addictive Diseases


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Human Genetic Correlates of the Addictive Diseases (MKR-0146)

Principal Investigator:
Mary Jeanne Kreek M.D.

Investigators:

Contact Information:
Elizabeth Ducat, N.P.
Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021
Telephone: 212-327-8282
Contact Information:
Brenda Ray, N.P.
Telephone: 212-327-8282
Alt. Telephone:
E-Mail:


Enrollment Status:
Open to Enrollment

Brief Summary of Protocol:
This study is to examine the possibility there are hereditary differences that may be a factor in addictive diseases. We will be studying people with and without a history of addictive disease.



Detailed Description of Protocol:
This requires a 2-4 hour visit to our outpatient clinic. A research nurse practitioner or physician will administer several questionnaires to assess your medical and psychological profiles. In addition, approximately 2 ounces of blood will be drawn for DNA analysis, and a urine specimen will be obtained to test for the presence of any drugs of abuse. All blood and urine samples are coded to protect the confidentiality of volunteers.



What specifically makes a person eligible for the study?
You may be eligible to enter this study:



- Volunteers with a history of addictive disease

OR

- Family members of persons with addictive disease

OR - Volunteers with no history of addictive disease

Gender:
Both

Age(s):
18 years and older

Children permitted to participate:
No

Potential Benefits.....
There are no direct benefits to participating in this study.

The knowledge that is gained from this study will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the addictive diseases and ultimately result in improvements in treatment.



Compensation:
There is no cost to you for being in this research study.

We will give you $60 to help pay for your expenses or time spent in this research study.