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(CGI-0573) Processing mechanisms of visual cortex


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Processing mechanisms of visual cortex (CGI-0573)

Principal Investigator:
Charles Gilbert M.D, Ph.D.

Investigators:

Contact Information:
Doruk Golcu
The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021
Telephone: 212-327-7664
Email: golcud@rockefeller.edu
Enrollment Status:
Closed to Enrollment

Brief Summary of Protocol:
The reason for doing this research is, we are studying how the brain processes visual images.



Detailed Description of Protocol:
You will be asked to respond verbally or by pressing buttons to the appearance of simple geometric patterns on a computer monitor.

The duration of each visit is expected to be 45-90 minutes, typically to a total of 15-20 sessions.

A second set of sessions involves functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures brain activity through changes in the magnetic characteristic of brain tissue. These imaging sessions will be performed in a high field strength (3T) MRI scanner at the bioimaging center at NYPH-WMC.

The scanning session involves lying in a tubular magnet for approximately one hour. One to four scanning sessions will be performed. Profile:
If you join the research study, you will take part for about 2 months.

The research study as a whole will last about 2 years.

About 30 people will take part in the research study.



What specifically makes a person eligible for the study?
You may be eligible to enter this study:



- Good or corrected vision

- Absence of metal objects within the participant's body are required.

Gender:
Both

Age(s):
All ages

Children permitted to participate:
Yes

Potential Benefits.....
No direct medical benefits are expected from this test, though such benefits might be obtained in the future if these experiments lead to information useful in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

The expected benefits associated with this study are a better understanding of the brain mechanisms of vision, leading possibly to the early diagnosis and improvement of visual problems, as well as behavioral disorders that are caused by defects in the basic mechanisms elucidated in this study.



Compensation:
You will receive $15/hour for your participation in this study.