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(MMA-0606) Mucosal and Innate Immune Responses and Viral Reservoirs in Tissues and Cells During Acute HIV Infection, Version 4.0 (CHAVI-012)


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Mucosal and Innate Immune Responses and Viral Reservoirs in Tissues and Cells During Acute HIV Infection, Version 4.0 (CHAVI-012)

Principal Investigator:
Martin H. Markowitz M.D.

Investigators:
Saurabh Mehandru M.D.
Teresa Evering M.D.
Marina Caskey M.D.

Contact Information:
Melissa La Mar
Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center
Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue
New York, NY 10065
Telephone: 212-327-7280
Email: mlamar@adarc.org
Enrollment Status:
Completed/Closed

Brief Summary of Protocol:
The reason for doing this research is to understand how people’s infection fighting (immune) system reacts to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), particularly in tissues from the body. The body is made up of cells, proteins, and other chemicals that help to fight infection. We want to know how the body works if a person is infected with HIV, both in the early stages of infection (called acute HIV infection), and after someone has been infected for longer (called chronic HIV infection). We also want to know how it works in people who are not infected with HIV so that we can compare them to those who are. The Rockefeller University is part of a group of scientists from all over the world doing research on how HIV works in the body. It is hoped that this research will help to make medicines to prevent the spread of HIV. HIV is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In order to learn how to develop a vaccine that may prevent infection by HIV, we need to study special cells of the immune system. Some of these cells are in the blood, but are rare and so can only be collected by a procedure called leukapheresis. Other blood cells are found in bones, and can only be collected by a procedure called bone marrow aspiration. We also want to examine genes, called DNA, since they might affect how one's body responds to HIV. For instance, a person that is very tall probably has different genes than a person who is very short. Understanding these “genetic” differences may help us understand how the human body responds to HIV.



Detailed Description of Protocol:




What specifically makes a person eligible for the study?
You may be eligible to enter this study:



Gender:
Both

Age(s):
18 years and older

Children permitted to participate:
No

Potential Benefits.....




Compensation: